Articles | Volume 20, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 9067–9085, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9067-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 9067–9085, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9067-2020
Research article
30 Jul 2020
Research article | 30 Jul 2020

Source attribution of Arctic black carbon and sulfate aerosols and associated Arctic surface warming during 1980–2018

Lili Ren et al.

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Short summary
Observations show that the concentrations of Arctic aerosols have declined since the early 1980s, which potentially contributed to the recent, rapid Arctic warming. We found that changes in sulfate and black carbon aerosols over the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere had a larger impact on Arctic temperature than other regions and that the aerosol-induced temperature change explained approximately 20 % of the observed Arctic warming during 1980–2018.
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