Articles | Volume 20, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 613–623, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-613-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 613–623, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-613-2020

Research article 17 Jan 2020

Research article | 17 Jan 2020

Surprising similarities in model and observational aerosol radiative forcing estimates

Edward Gryspeerdt et al.

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Latest update: 16 Sep 2021
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Short summary
Aerosol radiative forcing is a key uncertainty in our understanding of the human forcing of the climate, with much of this uncertainty coming from aerosol impacts on clouds. Observation-based estimates of the radiative forcing are typically smaller than those from global models, but it is not clear if they are more reliable. This work shows how the forcing components in global climate models can be identified, highlighting similarities between the two methods and areas for future investigation.
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