Articles | Volume 20, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 243–266, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-243-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 243–266, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-243-2020
Research article
06 Jan 2020
Research article | 06 Jan 2020

Very high stratospheric influence observed in the free troposphere over the northern Alps – just a local phenomenon?

Thomas Trickl et al.

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Short summary
Ozone transfer from the stratosphere to the troposphere seems to to have grown over the past decade, parallel to global warming. Lidar measurements, carried out in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, between 2007 and 2016 show a considerable stratospheric influence in the free troposphere over these sites, with observations of stratospheric layers in the troposphere on 84 % of the measurement days. This high fraction is almost reached also in North America, but frequently not throughout the year.
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