Articles | Volume 20, issue 22
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 14163–14182, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-14163-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 14163–14182, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-14163-2020

Research article 23 Nov 2020

Research article | 23 Nov 2020

Urbanization-induced land and aerosol impacts on sea-breeze circulation and convective precipitation

Jiwen Fan et al.

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Latest update: 13 Jun 2021
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Short summary
We investigate the urbanization-induced land and aerosol impacts on convective clouds and precipitation over Houston. We find that Houston urbanization notably enhances storm intensity and precipitation, with the anthropogenic aerosol effect more significant. Urban land effect strengthens sea-breeze circulation, leading to a faster development of warm cloud into mixed-phase cloud and earlier rain. The anthropogenic aerosol effect accelerates the development of storms into deep convection.
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