Articles | Volume 20, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 13319–13341, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-13319-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 13319–13341, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-13319-2020

Research article 11 Nov 2020

Research article | 11 Nov 2020

Rapid evolution of aerosol particles and their optical properties downwind of wildfires in the western US

Lawrence I. Kleinman et al.

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Latest update: 01 Aug 2021
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Short summary
Aerosols from wildfires affect the Earth's temperature by absorbing light or reflecting it back into space. This study investigates time-dependent chemical, microphysical, and optical properties of aerosols generated by wildfires in the Pacific Northwest, USA. Wildfire smoke plumes were traversed by an instrumented aircraft at locations near the fire and up to 3.5 h travel time downwind. Although there was no net aerosol production, aerosol particles grew and became more efficient scatters.
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