Articles | Volume 20, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 13041–13067, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-13041-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 13041–13067, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-13041-2020

Research article 07 Nov 2020

Research article | 07 Nov 2020

Quantifying sources of Brazil's CH4 emissions between 2010 and 2018 from satellite data

Rachel L. Tunnicliffe et al.

Data sets

History of chemically and radiatively important atmospheric gases from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) R. Prinn, R. Weiss, J. Arduini, T. Arnold, H. DeWitt, P. Fraser, A. Ganesan, J. Gasore, C. Harth, O. Hermansen, J. Kim, P. Krummel, S. Li, Z. Loh, C. Lunder, M. Maione, A. Manning, B. Miller, B. Mitrevski, J. Muhle, S. O'Doherty, S. Park, S. Reimann, M. Rigby, T. Saito, P. Salameh, R. Schmidt, P. Simmonds, L. Steele, M. Vollmer, H. J. Wang, B. Yao, Y. Yokouchi, D. Young, and L. Zhou https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/ATG.DB1001

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Short summary
This study quantifies Brazil’s emissions of a potent atmospheric greenhouse gas, methane. This is in the field of atmospheric modelling and uses remotely sensed data and surface measurements of methane concentrations as well as an atmospheric transport model to interpret the data. Because of Brazil’s large emissions from wetlands, agriculture and biomass burning, these emissions affect global methane concentrations and thus are of global significance.
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