Articles | Volume 20, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 11625–11637, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-11625-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 11625–11637, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-11625-2020

Research article 13 Oct 2020

Research article | 13 Oct 2020

Aerosol light absorption and the role of extremely low volatility organic compounds

Antonios Tasoglou et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Spyros Pandis on behalf of the Authors (17 Jun 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Jun 2020) by Veli-Matti Kerminen
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (26 Jul 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (27 Jul 2020) by Veli-Matti Kerminen
AR by Spyros Pandis on behalf of the Authors (21 Aug 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (25 Aug 2020) by Veli-Matti Kerminen
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Short summary
A month-long set of summertime measurements in a remote area in the Mediterranean is used to quantify aerosol absorption. The measured light absorption was two or more times higher than that of fresh black carbon. The absorption enhancement due to the coating of black carbon cores by other aerosol components could explain only part of this absorption enhancement. The rest was due to brown carbon, mostly in the form of extremely low volatility organic compounds.
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