Articles | Volume 19, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 7759–7774, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-7759-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 7759–7774, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-7759-2019

Research article 12 Jun 2019

Research article | 12 Jun 2019

Impacts of black carbon on the formation of advection–radiation fog during a haze pollution episode in eastern China

Qiuji Ding et al.

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Latest update: 19 Sep 2021
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Short summary
Aerosol plays an important role in advection–radiation fog formation in eastern China though stabilizing atmospheric stratification and enhancing onshore flow. For the fog–haze episode in December 2013, the effect of aerosol–radiation interaction overwhelmed that of aerosol–cloud interaction. Light-absorbing aerosol like black carbon was more crucial than scattering aerosols. This paper highlights the importance of interaction among aerosol, regional circulation and boundary layer.
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