Articles | Volume 19, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 7595–7608, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-7595-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 7595–7608, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-7595-2019

Research article 06 Jun 2019

Research article | 06 Jun 2019

New particle formation events observed at the King Sejong Station, Antarctic Peninsula – Part 2: Link with the oceanic biological activities

Eunho Jang et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Lorena Grabowski on behalf of the Authors (11 Apr 2019)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (15 Apr 2019) by Veli-Matti Kerminen
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (24 Apr 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (24 Apr 2019) by Veli-Matti Kerminen
AR by Ki-Tae Park on behalf of the Authors (26 Apr 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (06 May 2019) by Veli-Matti Kerminen
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Short summary
We reported long-term observations (from 2009 to 2016) of the nanoparticles measured at the Antarctic Peninsula (62.2° S, 58.8° W), and satellite-derived estimates of the biological characteristics were analyzed to identify the link between new particle formation and marine biota. The key finding from this research is that the formation of nanoparticles was strongly associated not only with the biomass of phytoplankton but, more importantly, also its taxonomic composition in the Antarctic Ocean.
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