Articles | Volume 19, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 499–521, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-499-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 499–521, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-499-2019

Research article 14 Jan 2019

Research article | 14 Jan 2019

Volatile organic compounds and ozone in Rocky Mountain National Park during FRAPPÉ

Katherine B. Benedict et al.

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Short summary
Rocky Mountain National Park experiences high ozone concentrations that can exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard. As part of the FRAPPÉ field campaign, a suite of volatile organic compounds were measured to characterize the sources of ozone precursors that contribute to high ozone in the park. These measurements indicate emissions from the Front Range in Colorado tied to oil and gas operations, urban areas, and the stratosphere contribute to episodes of elevated ozone.
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