Articles | Volume 19, issue 7
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4721-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4721-2019
Research article
 | 
09 Apr 2019
Research article |  | 09 Apr 2019

Residual layer ozone, mixing, and the nocturnal jet in California's San Joaquin Valley

Dani J. Caputi, Ian Faloona, Justin Trousdell, Jeanelle Smoot, Nicholas Falk, and Stephen Conley

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Short summary
This paper covers the importance of understanding ozone pollution in California’s southern San Joaquin Valley from the perspective of meteorological conditions that occur overnight. Our main finding is that stronger winds aloft allow ozone to be depleted overnight, leading to less ozone the following day. This finding has the potential to greatly improve ozone forecasts in the San Joaquin Valley. This study is primarily conducted with aircraft observations.
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