Articles | Volume 19, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4193–4210, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4193-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4193–4210, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4193-2019

Research article 03 Apr 2019

Research article | 03 Apr 2019

Contrasting local and long-range-transported warm ice-nucleating particles during an atmospheric river in coastal California, USA

Andrew C. Martin et al.

Data sets

Contrasting Local and Long-Range Transported Warm Ice-Nucleating Particles During an Atmospheric River in Coastal California, USA A. C. Martin, G. Cornwell, C. M. Beall, F. Cannon, S. Reilly, B. Schaap, D. Lucero, J. Creamean, F. M. Ralph, H. T. Mix, and K. Prather https://doi.org/10.6075/J05X274R

Model code and software

Contrasting Local and Long-Range Transported Warm Ice-Nucleating Particles During an Atmospheric River in Coastal California, USA A. C. Martin, G. Cornwell, C. M. Beall, F. Cannon, S. Reilly, B. Schaap, D. Lucero, J. Creamean, F. M. Ralph, H. T. Mix, and K. Prather https://doi.org/10.6075/J05X274R

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Short summary
Aerosols that promote ice formation in clouds were investigated during an atmospheric river that caused significant rain in northern California. We found that biological particles produced by local terrestrial ecosystems greatly enhanced cloud ice when meteorology allowed for their injection to the storm. The local terrestrial particles had greater impact on clouds than particles transported from across the Pacific Ocean, lending additional insight to which aerosols are important for cloud ice.
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