Articles | Volume 19, issue 6
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 3873–3883, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-3873-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 3873–3883, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-3873-2019

Research article 25 Mar 2019

Research article | 25 Mar 2019

Soil–atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide in a Mediterranean citrus orchard

Fulin Yang et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Fulin Yang on behalf of the Authors (27 Feb 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (11 Mar 2019) by Janne Rinne
AR by Fulin Yang on behalf of the Authors (13 Mar 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The contribution of soil carbonyl sulfate (COS) flux is probably the major limitation to the application of COS as a novel tracer of canopy-scale CO2 uptake. We provide new, field-based high-resolution results on the spatial and temporal variations in soil COS flux, its relationships to CO2 exchange and the key factors influencing it. We furthermore provide the only study, to our knowledge, that validate the surface dynamic chamber approach, increasingly used, with soil concentration profiles.
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