Articles | Volume 19, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 12587–12605, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-12587-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 12587–12605, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-12587-2019

Research article 09 Oct 2019

Research article | 09 Oct 2019

Estimating background contributions and US anthropogenic enhancements to maximum ozone concentrations in the northern US

David D. Parrish and Christine A. Ennis

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Short summary
Background ozone transported into cities contributes greatly to urban concentrations. Based on projections of past trends, the largest ozone concentrations on which the 70 ppb National Ambient Air Quality Standard is based will reach that standard by ∼ 2021 in the New York City area but much later (∼ 2050) in the Los Angeles region. The much smaller background contribution in New York City (45.8 ± 1.7 ppb) than in Los Angeles (62.0 ± 2.0 ppb) is the primary reason for this large difference.
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