Articles | Volume 19, issue 15
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 10239–10256, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-10239-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 10239–10256, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-10239-2019
Research article
13 Aug 2019
Research article | 13 Aug 2019

Biogenic and anthropogenic sources of aerosols at the High Arctic site Villum Research Station

Ingeborg E. Nielsen et al.

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Short summary
Measurements of the chemical composition of sub-micrometer aerosols were carried out in northern Greenland during the Arctic haze (February–May) where concentrations are high due to favorable conditions for long-range transport. Sulfate was the dominant aerosol (66 %), followed by organic matter (24 %). The highest black carbon concentrations where observed in February. Source apportionment yielded three factors: a primary factor (12 %), an Arctic haze factor (64 %) and a marine factor (22 %).
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