Articles | Volume 18, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 7827–7840, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-7827-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 7827–7840, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-7827-2018

Research article 04 Jun 2018

Research article | 04 Jun 2018

Aerosol–fog interaction and the transition to well-mixed radiation fog

Ian Boutle et al.

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Latest update: 27 Feb 2021
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Short summary
Aerosol processes are a key mechanism in the development of fog. Poor representation of aerosol–fog interaction can result in large biases in fog forecasts, such as surface temperatures which are too high and fog which is too deep and long lived. A relatively simple representation of aerosol–fog interaction can actually lead to significant improvements in forecasting. Aerosol–fog interaction can have a large effect on the climate system but is poorly represented in climate models.
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