Articles | Volume 18, issue 8
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 5953–5966, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5953-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 5953–5966, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5953-2018

Research article 27 Apr 2018

Research article | 27 Apr 2018

Particulate matter air pollution may offset ozone damage to global crop production

Luke D. Schiferl and Colette L. Heald

Viewed

Total article views: 2,289 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,409 842 38 2,289 22 46
  • HTML: 1,409
  • PDF: 842
  • XML: 38
  • Total: 2,289
  • BibTeX: 22
  • EndNote: 46
Views and downloads (calculated since 04 Dec 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 04 Dec 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 2,287 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 2,272 with geography defined and 15 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Discussed (preprint)

Latest update: 27 Feb 2021
Short summary
Global population growth and industrialization have contributed to poor air quality worldwide, and increasing population will put pressure on global food production. We therefore assess how air pollution may impact crop growth. Ozone has previously been shown to damage crops. We demonstrate that the impact of particles associated with enhanced light scattering promotes growth, offsetting much, if not all, ozone damage. This has implications for air quality management and global food security.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint