Articles | Volume 18, issue 8
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 5747–5763, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5747-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 5747–5763, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5747-2018
Research article
25 Apr 2018
Research article | 25 Apr 2018

Sensitivity of stomatal conductance to soil moisture: implications for tropospheric ozone

Alessandro Anav et al.

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Latest update: 27 Nov 2022
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Short summary
Soil moisture and water stress play a pivotal role in regulating stomatal behaviour of plants; however, the role of water availability is often neglected in atmospheric chemistry modelling studies. We show how dry deposition significantly declines when soil moisture is used to regulate the stomatal opening, mainly in semi-arid environments. Despite the fact that dry deposition occurs from the top of canopy to ground level, it affects the concentration of gases remaining in the lower atmosphere.
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