Articles | Volume 18, issue 8
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5619-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5619-2018
Research article
 | 
24 Apr 2018
Research article |  | 24 Apr 2018

Near-field emission profiling of tropical forest and Cerrado fires in Brazil during SAMBBA 2012

Amy K. Hodgson, William T. Morgan, Sebastian O'Shea, Stéphane Bauguitte, James D. Allan, Eoghan Darbyshire, Michael J. Flynn, Dantong Liu, James Lee, Ben Johnson, Jim M. Haywood, Karla M. Longo, Paulo E. Artaxo, and Hugh Coe

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Latest update: 20 Jun 2024
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Short summary
We flew a large atmospheric research aircraft across a number of different biomass burning environments in the Amazon Basin in September and October 2012. In this paper, we focus on smoke sampled very close to fresh fires (only 600–900 m above the fires and smoke that was 4–6 min old) to examine the chemical components that make up the smoke and their abundance. We found substantial differences in the emitted smoke that are due to the fuel type and combustion processes driving the fires.
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