Articles | Volume 18, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 4549–4566, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-4549-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 4549–4566, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-4549-2018

Research article 05 Apr 2018

Research article | 05 Apr 2018

Which processes drive observed variations of HCHO columns over India?

Luke Surl et al.

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Latest update: 24 Jul 2021
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Short summary
We used observations of HCHO formaldehyde columns from the OMI satellite instrument and the GEOS-Chem atmospheric chemistry model to investigate how and why HCHO varies over India. We find that emissions of biogenic VOC from forests are the most powerful driver, with forests' response to seasonal temperature variations causing variation over time. Human-driven emissions of VOC and burning of vegetation have detectable, but more limited, impacts.
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