Articles | Volume 18, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2259–2286, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2259-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2259–2286, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2259-2018

Research article 15 Feb 2018

Research article | 15 Feb 2018

Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE): emissions of particulate matter from wood- and dung-fueled cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

Thilina Jayarathne et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Elizabeth Stone on behalf of the Authors (14 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (15 Sep 2017) by James Allan
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (01 Oct 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (10 Oct 2017)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (10 Oct 2017) by James Allan
AR by Elizabeth Stone on behalf of the Authors (16 Oct 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 Oct 2017) by James Allan
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Short summary
Emissions of fine particulate matter and its constituents were quantified for a variety of under-sampled combustion sources in South Asia: wood and dung cooking fires, generators, groundwater pumps, brick kilns, trash burning, and open burning of biomasses. Garbage burning and three-stone cooking fires were among the highest emitters, while servicing of motor vehicles significantly reduced PM. These data may be used in source apportionment and to update regional and global emission inventories.
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