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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Since 2007 atmospheric methane (CH4) has been unexpectedly increasing following a 6-year hiatus. We have used an atmospheric model to attribute regional sources and global sinks of CH4 using observations for the 2003–2015 period. Model results show the renewed growth is best explained by decreased atmospheric removal, decreased biomass burning emissions, and an increased energy sector (mainly from Africa–Middle East and Southern Asia–Oceania) and wetland emissions (mainly from northern Eurasia).
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ACP | Articles | Volume 18, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 18149–18168, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-18149-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 18149–18168, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-18149-2018

Research article 21 Dec 2018

Research article | 21 Dec 2018

Attribution of recent increases in atmospheric methane through 3-D inverse modelling

Joe McNorton et al.

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Short summary
Since 2007 atmospheric methane (CH4) has been unexpectedly increasing following a 6-year hiatus. We have used an atmospheric model to attribute regional sources and global sinks of CH4 using observations for the 2003–2015 period. Model results show the renewed growth is best explained by decreased atmospheric removal, decreased biomass burning emissions, and an increased energy sector (mainly from Africa–Middle East and Southern Asia–Oceania) and wetland emissions (mainly from northern Eurasia).
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