Articles | Volume 18, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15403–15418, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15403-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15403–15418, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15403-2018
Research article
26 Oct 2018
Research article | 26 Oct 2018

Airborne particulate matter monitoring in Kenya using calibrated low-cost sensors

Francis D. Pope et al.

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Short summary
Low- and middle-income countries face an increasing threat from poor air quality, stemming from rapid urbanization, population growth, and rises in fuel and motorization use. This paper presents high temporal resolution particulate matter (PM) data, using low-cost sensors, for the exemplar city of Nairobi, Kenya, where PM levels are found to be much greater than WHO recommendations. The study shows that calibrated low-cost sensors can be successfully used to measure PM in cities like Nairobi.
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