Articles | Volume 18, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15169–15182, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15169-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15169–15182, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15169-2018

Research article 22 Oct 2018

Research article | 22 Oct 2018

Emissions from village cookstoves in Haryana, India, and their potential impacts on air quality

Lauren T. Fleming et al.

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Short summary
Brushwood- and dung-burning cookstoves are used for cooking and heating and influence ambient air quality for millions of people. We report emission factors from the more efficient cookstove, the chulha, compared to the smoldering angithi, for carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and 76 volatile organic compounds. This comprehensive gas emission inventory should inform policy makers about the magnitude of the effect of cookstoves on the air quality in India.
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