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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 18, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14149–14159, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14149-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14149–14159, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14149-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 05 Oct 2018

Research article | 05 Oct 2018

Changes in sea-surface temperature and atmospheric circulation patterns associated with reductions in Arctic sea ice cover in recent decades

Lejiang Yu and Shiyuan Zhong

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Latest update: 02 Aug 2020
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Short summary
The Arctic sea ice has been declining at a rapid pace in recent decades, which has been attributed largely to global warming. Using a relatively novel statistical method called self-organizing maps (SOM), we show that a large portion of the autumn Arctic sea ice decline in the past four decades may be explained by atmospheric circulation anomalies associated with anomalous sea-surface temperature patterns over the North Pacific and North Atlantic through ocean–atmosphere interactions.
The Arctic sea ice has been declining at a rapid pace in recent decades, which has been...
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