Articles | Volume 18, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 1291–1306, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-1291-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 1291–1306, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-1291-2018

Research article 31 Jan 2018

Research article | 31 Jan 2018

Long-term (2001–2012) trends of carbonaceous aerosols from a remote island in the western North Pacific: an outflow region of Asian pollutants

Suresh K. R. Boreddy et al.

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Latest update: 23 Sep 2021
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Short summary
To better understand the impact of long-range atmospheric transport of East Asian pollutants over the western North Pacific, we conducted a long-term (2001–12) study on carbonaceous aerosols over the WNP, which demonstrates that the photochemical formation of WSOC and its contributions to SOA have increased over the western North Pacific via long-range atmospheric transport. Biomass-burning-derived carbonaceous aerosols have increased, while primary fossil-fuel-derived aerosols have decreased.
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