Articles | Volume 17, issue 15
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9623-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9623-2017
Research article
 | 
10 Aug 2017
Research article |  | 10 Aug 2017

Possible climatic implications of high-altitude black carbon emissions

Gaurav Govardhan, Sreedharan Krishnakumari Satheesh, Ravi Nanjundiah, Krishnaswamy Krishna Moorthy, and Surendran Suresh Babu

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Latest update: 20 Jun 2024
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Short summary
Using a model, we show that black carbon emissions from aircraft are most likely responsible for the observed high-altitude BC layers over the Indian region. Our analysis of model simulations and CALIPSO data shows that such aircraft-emitted BC layers can be vertically transported into the UTLS region upon their interaction with the underlying strong monsoonal convection. Such lifted BC layers, which intrude into the stratosphere, can potentially harm the stratospheric ozone layer.
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