Articles | Volume 17, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8619–8633, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-8619-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8619–8633, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-8619-2017

Research article 14 Jul 2017

Research article | 14 Jul 2017

Arctic regional methane fluxes by ecotope as derived using eddy covariance from a low-flying aircraft

David S. Sayres et al.

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Short summary
Arctic temperatures have risen faster than the global average, causing the depth of melting of the frozen ground to increase. Previously frozen organic carbon, once exposed to air, water, and microbes, is turned into carbon dioxide and methane, both of which are important greenhouse gases. Due to the large and varied surface area of the Arctic and the difficulty of making measurements there we use a low flying aircraft (<25 m) to measure the amount of methane released from different regions.
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