Articles | Volume 17, issue 10
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6243–6255, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-6243-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6243–6255, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-6243-2017

Research article 22 May 2017

Research article | 22 May 2017

Effect of anthropogenic aerosol emissions on precipitation in warm conveyor belts in the western North Pacific in winter – a model study with ECHAM6-HAM

Hanna Joos et al.

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Short summary
The influence of pollution on the precipitation formation in warm conveyor belts (WCBs), the most rising air streams in low-pressure systems is investigated. We investigate in detail the cloud properties and resulting precipitation along these rising airstreams which are simulated with a global climate model. Overall, no big impact of aerosols on precipitation can be seen, however, when comparing the most polluted/cleanest WCBs, a suppression of precipitation by aerosols is observed.
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