Articles | Volume 17, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 485–499, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-485-2017

Special issue: The SPARC Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (S-RIP) (ACP/ESSD...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 485–499, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-485-2017

Research article 11 Jan 2017

Research article | 11 Jan 2017

Revisiting the observed surface climate response to large volcanic eruptions

Fabian Wunderlich and Daniel M. Mitchell

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Short summary
Large volcanic eruptions can eject aerosols into the stratosphere and prevent UV radiation reaching the surface, resulting in surface cooling. A secondary, non-linear effect occurs at high latitudes. While the surface cooling is robust in observations, we show that the non-linear, high-latitude effect is less robust. Climate models have failures at reproducing both aspects, probably because of aliasing with other climate modes and overrepresentation of stratospheric aerosol.
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