Articles | Volume 17, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 2477–2493, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2477-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 2477–2493, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2477-2017

Research article 16 Feb 2017

Research article | 16 Feb 2017

Regional influence of wildfires on aerosol chemistry in the western US and insights into atmospheric aging of biomass burning organic aerosol

Shan Zhou et al.

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Latest update: 17 Apr 2021
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Short summary
Wildfire plumes in the western US were sampled at a high-elevation site in summer 2013. Three distinct BBOA types were identified, representing biomass burning OA with different degrees of atmospheric processing. Analysis of consecutive BB plumes transported from the same fire source showed that photooxidation led to enhanced mass fractions of aged BBOAs but negligible net OA production. A possible reason is that SOA formation was almost entirely balanced by BBOA volatilization during transport.
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