Articles | Volume 17, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1741–1758, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1741-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1741–1758, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1741-2017

Research article 03 Feb 2017

Research article | 03 Feb 2017

Evolution of the eastward shift in the quasi-stationary minimum of the Antarctic total ozone column

Asen Grytsai et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Gennadi Milinevsky on behalf of the Authors (25 Oct 2016)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (09 Nov 2016) by Jayanarayanan Kuttippurath
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (13 Nov 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (13 Dec 2016)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (18 Dec 2016) by Jayanarayanan Kuttippurath
AR by Gennadi Milinevsky on behalf of the Authors (28 Dec 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (10 Jan 2017) by Jayanarayanan Kuttippurath
AR by Gennadi Milinevsky on behalf of the Authors (14 Jan 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Twenty years ago we discovered that the ozone hole shape is asymmetric. This asymmetry is minimum over the Weddell Sea region and maximum over the Ross Sea area. Later we detected that the position of the ozone minimum is shifting east. We have continued to follow this event, and a couple years ago we revealed that the shift is slowing down and starting to move back. We connect all this movement with ozone hole increase; since 2000 the ozone layer has been stabilizing and recently recovering.
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