Articles | Volume 17, issue 22
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-13559-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-13559-2017
Research article
 | 
15 Nov 2017
Research article |  | 15 Nov 2017

Aerosol trends as a potential driver of regional climate in the central United States: evidence from observations

Daniel H. Cusworth, Loretta J. Mickley, Eric M. Leibensperger, and Michael J. Iacono

Viewed

Total article views: 2,709 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
1,628 983 98 2,709 430 65 106
  • HTML: 1,628
  • PDF: 983
  • XML: 98
  • Total: 2,709
  • Supplement: 430
  • BibTeX: 65
  • EndNote: 106
Views and downloads (calculated since 29 Mar 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 29 Mar 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 2,709 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 2,672 with geography defined and 37 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 23 Jul 2024
Download
Short summary
Since 1990, light-scattering pollution known as aerosols have declined as a result of tightening US air quality regulations. Our study finds that US surface solar radiation has increased simultaneously. We establish a link between aerosols and radiation through physical and statistical models. We find the strongest relationship between aerosols, radiation, and climate at a site in the Midwest. Our work underscores the importance of regional pollution on climate in the US and abroad.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint