Articles | Volume 17, issue 18
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11163–11176, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11163-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11163–11176, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11163-2017

Research article 20 Sep 2017

Research article | 20 Sep 2017

Quantifying alkane emissions in the Eagle Ford Shale using boundary layer enhancement

Geoffrey Roest and Gunnar Schade

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Geoffrey Roest on behalf of the Authors (21 Apr 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Apr 2017) by Steven Brown
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (05 May 2017)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (13 May 2017) by Steven Brown
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (14 Jun 2017)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (27 Jul 2017) by Steven Brown
AR by Geoffrey Roest on behalf of the Authors (02 Aug 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
We used atmospheric concentrations of hydrocarbons to estimate emissions from regional oil and gas activities in the Eagle Ford Shale in southern Texas to better understand their air quality impacts. While higher hydrocarbons emissions are underestimated, emissions of methane from raw natural gas sources appear lower than the US EPA's current estimate. However, we identified liquid storage tanks as an additional source of methane and as the dominant source of regional hydrocarbon emissions.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint