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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 17, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1–20, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1–20, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 02 Jan 2017

Research article | 02 Jan 2017

A missing source of aerosols in Antarctica – beyond long-range transport, phytoplankton, and photochemistry

Michael R. Giordano et al.

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This paper summarizes two field measurements of particles and gases made in coastal Antarctica and represents the first real-time composition measurements of particles in this understudied area of the world. Using the combined data from both field measurements, we find that there is a constant background of particles in coastal Antarctica and that they are mostly sulfate. Seasonal transitions from winter to spring add additional particles, and that from spring to summer adds additional sulfate.
This paper summarizes two field measurements of particles and gases made in coastal Antarctica...
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