Articles | Volume 16, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 11207–11217, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-11207-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 11207–11217, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-11207-2016

Research article 12 Sep 2016

Research article | 12 Sep 2016

Aerosol optical extinction during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) 2014 summertime field campaign, Colorado, USA

Justin H. Dingle et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Roya Bahreini on behalf of the Authors (08 Aug 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (09 Aug 2016) by Jason Surratt
AR by Roya Bahreini on behalf of the Authors (09 Aug 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (21 Aug 2016) by Jason Surratt
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Short summary
The focus of this paper was to use gas-phase tracers and aerosol composition to characterize the influence of the different sources on optical extinction (RH = 22 %) and summertime visibility in the Colorado Front Range. Our analysis indicates that aerosol nitrate contributed significantly to optical extinction in agriculturally influenced air masses, while in other plumes, organics could explain most of the observed variability in optical extinction.
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