Articles | Volume 15, issue 15
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-8809-2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-8809-2015
Research article
 | 
12 Aug 2015
Research article |  | 12 Aug 2015

The anthropogenic contribution to atmospheric black carbon concentrations in southern Africa: a WRF-Chem modeling study

F. Kuik, A. Lauer, J. P. Beukes, P. G. Van Zyl, M. Josipovic, V. Vakkari, L. Laakso, and G. T. Feig

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Short summary
The numerical model WRF-Chem is used to estimate the contribution of anthropogenic emissions to BC, aerosol optical depth and atmospheric heating rates over southern Africa. An evaluation of the model with observational data including long-term BC measurements shows that the basic meteorology is reproduced reasonably well but simulated near-surface BC concentrations are underestimated by up to 50%. It is found that up to 100% of the BC in highly industrialized regions is of anthropogenic origin.
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