Articles | Volume 15, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 757–782, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-757-2015

Special issue: Coupled chemistry–meteorology modelling: status and...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 757–782, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-757-2015

Research article 21 Jan 2015

Research article | 21 Jan 2015

Ozone production and transport over the Amazon Basin during the dry-to-wet and wet-to-dry transition seasons

M. M. Bela et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Megan Bela on behalf of the Authors (13 Oct 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (20 Oct 2014) by Alex B. Guenther
ED: Publish as is (21 Nov 2014) by Alex B. Guenther
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Short summary
In the Amazon Basin, gases that lead to the formation of ozone (O3), an air pollutant and greenhouse gas, are emitted from fire, urban and biogenic sources. This study presents the first basin wide aircraft measurements of O3 during the dry-to-wet and wet-to-dry transition seasons, which show extremely low values above undisturbed forest and increases from fires. This work also demonstrates the capabilities and limitations of regional atmospheric chemistry models in representing O3 in Amazonia.
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