Articles | Volume 15, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 7173–7193, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-7173-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 7173–7193, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-7173-2015
Research article
01 Jul 2015
Research article | 01 Jul 2015

Fire emission heights in the climate system – Part 2: Impact on transport, black carbon concentrations and radiation

A. Veira et al.

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Short summary
Global aerosol-climate models usually prescribe wildfire emission injections at fixed atmospheric levels. Here, we quantify the impact of prescribed and parametrized emission heights on aerosol long-range transport and radiation. For global emission height changes of 1.5-3.5km, we find a top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing of 0.05-0.1Wm-2. Replacing prescribed emission heights by a simple plume height parametrization only marginally improves the model performance in aerosol optical thickness.
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