Articles | Volume 15, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 13915–13938, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-13915-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 13915–13938, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-13915-2015
Research article
17 Dec 2015
Research article | 17 Dec 2015

Biomass burning emissions and potential air quality impacts of volatile organic compounds and other trace gases from fuels common in the US

J. B. Gilman et al.

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A comprehensive suite of instruments was used to quantify the emissions of over 200 organic and inorganic gases from 56 laboratory burns of 18 different biomass fuel types common in the southeastern, southwestern, or northern United States. Emission ratios relative to carbon monoxide (CO) are used to characterize the composition of gases emitted by mass; OH reactivity; and potential secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors for the three different U.S. fuel regions presented here.
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