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Volume 15, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 12623–12644, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-12623-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: East Asia emissions assessment (EA2)

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 12623–12644, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-12623-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 12 Nov 2015

Research article | 12 Nov 2015

Advantages of a city-scale emission inventory for urban air quality research and policy: the case of Nanjing, a typical industrial city in the Yangtze River Delta, China

Y. Zhao1,2,*, L. P. Qiu1,*, R. Y. Xu1, F. J. Xie3, Q. Zhang4, Y. Y. Yu5, C. P. Nielsen6, H. X. Qin3, H. K. Wang1, X. C. Wu1, W. Q. Li3, and J. Zhang2,7 Y. Zhao et al.
  • 1State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse and School of the Environment, Nanjing University, 163 Xianlin Ave., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023, China
  • 2Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center of Atmospheric Environment and Equipment Technology (CICAEET), Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Jiangsu 210044, China
  • 3Nanjing Academy of Environmental Protection Science, 175 Huju Rd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210013, China
  • 4Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Center for Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
  • 5Nanjing Environmental Monitoring Central Station, 175 Huju Rd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210013, China
  • 6Harvard China Project, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
  • 7Jiangsu Provincial Academy of Environmental Science, 176 North Jiangdong Rd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210036, China
  • *These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract. With most eastern Chinese cities facing major air quality challenges, there is a strong need for city-scale emission inventories for use in both chemical transport modeling and the development of pollution control policies. In this paper, a high-resolution emission inventory (with a horizontal resolution of 3 × 3 km) of air pollutants and CO2 for Nanjing, a typical large city in the Yangtze River Delta, is developed, incorporating the best available information on local sources. Emission factors and activity data at the unit or facility level are collected and compiled using a thorough on-site survey of major sources. Over 900 individual plants, which account for 97 % of the city's total coal consumption, are identified as point sources, and all of the emission-related parameters including combustion technology, fuel quality, and removal efficiency of air pollution control devices (APCD) are analyzed. New data-collection approaches including continuous emission monitoring systems and real-time monitoring of traffic flows are employed to improve spatiotemporal distribution of emissions. Despite fast growth of energy consumption between 2010 and 2012, relatively small interannual changes in emissions are found for most air pollutants during this period, attributed mainly to benefits of growing APCD deployment and the comparatively strong and improving regulatory oversight of the large point sources that dominate the levels and spatial distributions of Nanjing emissions overall. The improvement of this city-level emission inventory is indicated by comparisons with observations and other inventories at larger spatial scale. Relatively good spatial correlations are found for SO2, NOx, and CO between the city-scale emission estimates and concentrations at nine state-operated monitoring sites (R = 0.58, 0.46, and 0.61, respectively). The emission ratios of specific pollutants including BC to CO, OC to EC, and CO2 to CO compare well to top-down constraints from ground observations. The interannual variability and spatial distribution of NOx emissions are consistent with NO2 vertical column density measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). In particular, the Nanjing city-scale emission inventory correlates better with satellite observations than the downscaled Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China (MEIC) does when emissions from power plants are excluded. This indicates improvement in emission estimation for sectors other than power generation, notably industry and transportation. A high-resolution emission inventory may also provide a basis to consider the quality of instrumental observations. To further improve emission estimation and evaluation, more measurements of both emission factors and ambient levels of given pollutants are suggested; the uncertainties of emission inventories at city scale should also be fully quantified and compared with those at national scale.

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A high-resolution emission inventory of air pollutants and CO2 for Nanjing, a typical city in eastern China, is developed, incorporating the best available local information from on-site surveys. The temporal and spatial distribution of the emissions and the correlation between specific species of the inventory are assessed by comparisons with observations and other inventories at larger spatial scale. The emission inventory provides a basis to consider the quality of instrumental observations.
A high-resolution emission inventory of air pollutants and CO2 for Nanjing, a typical city in...
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