Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-574
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-574

  08 Jul 2020

08 Jul 2020

Review status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Black Carbon Seasonal and Diurnal Variation in surface snow in Svalbard and its Connections to Atmospheric Variables

Michele Bertò1,a, David Cappelletti2,7, Elena Barbaro1,3, Cristiano Varin1, Jean-Charles Gallet4, Krzysztof Markowicz5, Anna Rozwadowska6, Mauro Mazzola7, Stefano Crocchianti2, Luisa Poto1,3, Paolo Laj8, Carlo Barbante1,3, and Andrea Spolaor1,2 Michele Bertò et al.
  • 1Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Dept. Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, via Torino, 155 – 8 30172 Venice-Mestre, Italy
  • 2Università degli Studi di Perugia, Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Perugia, Italy
  • 3CNR-ISP, Institute of Polar Science – National Research Council – via Torino, 155 – 30172 Venice-Mestre, Italy
  • 4Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway
  • 5University of Warsaw, Institute of Geophysics, Warsaw, Poland
  • 6Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sopot, Poland
  • 7CNR-ISP, Institute of Polar Science – National Research Council – Via Gobetti 101, Bologna
  • 8Univ. Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS, IRD, Grenoble-INP, IGE, 38000 Grenoble, France
  • anow at: Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland

Abstract. Black Carbon (BC) is a major forcing agent in the Arctic but substantial uncertainty remains to quantify its climate effects due to the complexity of mechanisms involved. In this study, we provide unique information on processes driving the variability of BC mass concentration in surface snow in the Arctic. Two different snow-sampling strategies were adopted during spring 2014 and 2015, focusing on the refractory BC (rBC) mass Ny-Ålesund concentration daily/hourly variability on a seasonal/daily time scale (referred to as 80-days and 3-days experiments). Despite the low rBC mass concentrations (never exceeding 22 ng g−1), a daily variability of up to 4.5 ng g−1 was observed. Atmospheric, meteorological and snow-related physico-chemical parameters were considered in multiple statistical models to understand the factors behind the observed variation of rBC mass concentrations. Results indicate that the main drivers of the variation of rBC are the precipitations events, snow metamorphism (melting-refreezing cycles, surface hoar formation and sublimation) and the activation of local sources (wind resuspension) during the snow melting periods. The rBC in the snow seems de-coupled with the atmospheric BC load. Our results highlighted a common association of snow rBC with coarse mode particles number concentration and with snow precipitation events.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Michele Bertò et al.

Interactive discussion

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Michele Bertò et al.

Michele Bertò et al.

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This preprint has been withdrawn.

Short summary
We present the daily and seasonal variability of Black carbon inferred from two specific experiment based on the hourly and daily time resolution sampling strategy. These unique datasets give us for the first time the opportunity to evaluate the associations between the observed surface snow rBC mass concentration and a set of predictors corresponding to the considered meteorological and snow physico-chemical parameters, via a multiple linear regression approach.
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