Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-837
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2019-837

  08 Nov 2019

08 Nov 2019

Review status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Contribution of horizontal and vertical advection to the formation of small-scale vertical structures of ozone in the lower and middle stratosphere at Fairbanks, Alaska

Miho Yamamori1, Yasuhiro Murayama2, Kazuo Shibasaki3, Isao Murata4, and Kaoru Sato5 Miho Yamamori et al.
  • 1Department of Teacher Education, Tsuru University, Yamanashi, 402-8555, Japan
  • 2National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Tokyo, 184-8795, Japan
  • 3Department of Elementary Education, Faculty of Human Development, Kokugakuin University, Yokohama, 225-0003, Japan
  • 4Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579, Japan
  • 5Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan

Abstract. The contribution of vertical and horizontal advection to the production of small-scale vertical ozone structures was investigated using data from an ozonesonde observation performed at intervals of 3 h in Fairbanks (64.8N, 147.9W), Alaska. The dominant vertical scales of the ozone mixing ratio were determined to be 2–5 km, which were similar to those of horizontal winds and the temperature of the lower and middle stratosphere, using spectral analysis. Ozone fluctuations due to vertical advection were estimated from the potential temperature fluctuation and vertical gradient of the background ozone mixing ratio. Residual ozone fluctuations are attributed to horizontal advection. Fluctuations due to horizontal advection are dominant, as reported in previous studies. The cross-correlation of the effects of vertical and horizontal advection was also evaluated. The correlation is relatively larger at altitudes of 18–23 km and 32–33 km compared to those at other height regions. In contrast to previous studies, horizontal advection by gravity waves seems to play a dominant role in the production of small-scale ozone structures at altitudes of 32–35 km.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Miho Yamamori et al.

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Interactive discussion

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Miho Yamamori et al.

Miho Yamamori et al.

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Short summary
The contribution of vertical and horizontal advection to the production of small-scale vertical ozone structures in the stratosphere is investigated using data from an ozonesonde observation performed at intervals of 3 h in Fairbanks, Alaska. A case is reported in which horizontal advection due to an inertia gravity wave with near-inertial frequency mainly contributes to the formation of a small-scale vertical ozone structure in the middle stratosphere.
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