Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acpd-15-1171-2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acpd-15-1171-2015

  14 Jan 2015

14 Jan 2015

Review status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Lidar observations of Nabro volcano aerosol layers in the stratosphere over Gwangju, Korea

D. Shin1, D. Müller2,3,4, K. Lee5, S. Shin2, Y. J. Kim2, C. K. Song1, and Y. M. Noh2 D. Shin et al.
  • 1National Institute of Environmental Research, Kyungseo-dong, Seo-gu, Incheon 404-708, South Korea
  • 2School of Environmental Science & Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST) Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712, Korea
  • 3Science Systems and Applications, Inc., MS 475 NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681, USA
  • 4University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB, UK
  • 5Department of Environmental Science & Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science & Technology, Gwangju, South Korea

Abstract. We report on the first Raman lidar measurements of stratospheric aerosol layers in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Korea. The data were taken with the multiwavelength aerosol Raman lidar at Gwangju (35.10° N, 126.53° E), Korea. The volcanic ash particles and gases were released around 12 June 2011 during the eruption of the Nabro volcano (13.37° N, 41.7° E) in Eritrea, east Africa. Forward trajectory computations show that the volcanic aerosols were advected from North Africa to East Asia. The first observation of the stratospheric aerosol layers over Korea was on 19 June 2011. The stratospheric aerosol layers appeared between 15 and 17 km height a.s.l. The aerosol layers' maximum value of the backscatter coefficient and the linear particle depolarization ratio at 532 nm were 1.5 ± 0.3 Mm−1 sr−1 and 2.2%, respectively. We found these values at 16.4 km height a.s.l. 44 days after this first observation, we observed the stratospheric aerosol layer again. We continuously probed the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for this aerosol layer during the following 5 months, until December 2011. The aerosol layers typically occurred between 10 and 20 km height a.s.l. The stratospheric aerosol optical depth and the maximum backscatter coefficient at 532 nm decreased during these 5 months.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

D. Shin et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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D. Shin et al.

D. Shin et al.

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This preprint has been withdrawn.

Short summary
We present for the first time results of Raman lidar observations of the temporal evolution of a stratospheric aerosol layer observed in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Korea. We find what non-spherical particles may have been present in the lower stratosphere for at least six months after the eruption on the volcano. Our study adds to the limited information on volcanic aerosols over East Asia.
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