Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acpd-14-20159-2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acpd-14-20159-2014

  04 Aug 2014

04 Aug 2014

Review status: this preprint was under review for the journal ACP but the revision was not accepted.

Transport pathways of peroxyacetyl nitrate in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere from different monsoon systems during the summer monsoon season

S. Fadnavis1, K. Semeniuk2, M. G. Schultz3, A. Mahajan1, L. Pozzoli4, S. Sonbawane1, and M. Kiefer5 S. Fadnavis et al.
  • 1Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, India
  • 2Department of Earth and Space Sciences and Engineering, York University, Toronto, Canada
  • 3Institute for Energy and Climate Research-Troposphere (IEK-8), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, Germany
  • 4Eurasia Institute of Earth Sciences, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 5Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Karlsruhe, Germany

Abstract. The Asian summer monsoon involves complex transport patterns with large scale redistribution of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). We employ the global chemistry–climate model ECHAM5-HAMMOZ in order to evaluate the transport pathways and the contributions of nitrogen oxide reservoir species PAN, NOx, and HNO3 from various monsoon regions, to the UTLS over Southern Asia and vice versa. The model is evaluated with trace gas retrievals from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-E) and aircraft campaigns during the monsoon season (June–September).

There are three regions which contribute substantial pollution to the UTLS during the monsoon: the Asian summer monsoon (ASM), the North American Monsoon (NAM) and the West African monsoon (WAM). However, penetration due to ASM convection is deeper into the UTLS as compared to NAM and WAM outflow. The circulation in these monsoon regions distributes PAN into the tropical latitude belt in the upper troposphere. Remote transport also occurs in the extratropical upper troposphere where westerly winds drive North American and European pollutants eastward to partly merge with the ASM plume. Strong ASM convection transports these remote and regional pollutants into the lower stratosphere. In the lower stratosphere the injected pollutants are transported westward by easterly winds. The intense convective activity in the monsoon regions is associated with lightning generation and thereby the emission of NOy species. This will affect the distribution of PAN in the UTLS. The estimates of lightning produced PAN, HNO3, NOx and ozone obtained from control and lightning-off simulations shows high percentage changes over the regions of convective transport especially equatorial Africa and America and comparatively less over the ASM. This indicates higher anthropogenic pollution transport from the ASM region into the UTLS.

S. Fadnavis et al.

 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

S. Fadnavis et al.

S. Fadnavis et al.

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