Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-433
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-433
 
28 Jun 2022
28 Jun 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Supercooled liquid water clouds observed over Dome C, Antarctica: temperature sensitivity and surface radiation impact

Philippe Ricaud1, Massimo Del Guasta2, Angelo Lupi3, Romain Roehrig1, Eric Bazile1, Pierre Durand4, Jean-Luc Attié4, Alessia Nicosia3, and Paolo Grigioni5 Philippe Ricaud et al.
  • 1CNRM, Université de Toulouse, Météo-France, CNRS, Toulouse, France
  • 2INO-CNR, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy
  • 3ISAC-CNR, Bologna, Italy
  • 4Laboratoire d’Aérologie, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, UPS, Toulouse, France
  • 5ENEA, Roma, Italy

Abstract. Clouds affect the Earth climate with an impact that depends on the cloud nature (solid/ liquid water). Although the Antarctic climate is changing rapidly, cloud observations are sparse over Antarctica due to few ground stations and satellite observations. The Concordia station is located on the East Antarctic Plateau (75° S, 123° E, 3233 m above mean sea level), one of the driest and coldest places on Earth. We used observations of clouds, temperature, liquid water and surface radiation performed at Concordia during 4 austral summers (December 2018–2021) to analyze the link between liquid water and temperature and its impact on surface radiation in the presence of supercooled liquid water (liquid water for temperature less than 0 °C) clouds (SLWCs). Our analysis shows that, within SLWCs, temperature logarithmically increases from -36.0 °C to -16.0 °C when liquid water path increases from 1.0 to 14.0 g m-2, and SLWCs positively impact the net surface radiation, which logarithmically increases by 0.0 to 50.0 W m-2 when liquid water path increases from 1.7 to 3.0 g m-2. We finally estimate that SLWCs have a great potential radiative impact over Antarctica whatever the season considered, up to 5.0 W m-2 over the Eastern Antarctic Plateau and up to 30 W m-2 over the Antarctic Peninsula in summer.

Philippe Ricaud et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2022-433', Anonymous Referee #1, 04 Aug 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2022-433', Anonymous Referee #2, 18 Aug 2022

Philippe Ricaud et al.

Philippe Ricaud et al.

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Short summary
Clouds affect the Earth climate with an impact that depends on the cloud type (solid/liquid water). From observations made at Concordia (Antarctica), we show that, in supercooled liquid water (liquid water for temperature less than 0 °C) clouds (SLWCs), temperature increases with liquid water and SLWCs positively impact the net surface radiation, up to 30 W m-2 extrapolated over the Antarctic Peninsula. This stresses the importance of accurately modelling SLWCs to forecast the Earth Climate.
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