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https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-372
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2020-372
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  06 May 2020

06 May 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Impacts of Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations on Simulated Aerosol–Cloud-Interactions for Deep Convective Clouds over Houston

Yuwei Zhang1,2, Jiwen Fan2, Zhanqing Li1, and Daniel Rosenfeld3 Yuwei Zhang et al.
  • 1Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA
  • 2Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA
  • 3Institute of Earth Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel

Abstract. Aerosol–cloud interactions remain largely uncertain in predicting their impacts on weather and climate. Cloud microphysics parameterization is one of the factors leading to the large uncertainty. Here we investigate the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the convective intensity and precipitation of a thunderstorm occurring on 19 June 2013 over Houston with the Chemistry version of Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF‐Chem) using the Morrison two-moment bulk scheme and spectral-bin microphysics (SBM) scheme. We find that the SBM predicts a deep convective cloud agreeing better with observations in terms of reflectivity and precipitation compared with the Morrison bulk scheme that has been used in many weather and climate models. With the SBM scheme, we see a significant invigoration effect on convective intensity and precipitation by anthropogenic aerosols mainly through enhanced condensation latent heating (i.e., the warm-phase invigoration). Whereas such effect is absent with the Morrison two-moment bulk microphysics, mainly due to limitations of the saturation adjustment approach for droplet condensation and evaporation calculation.

Yuwei Zhang et al.

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Yuwei Zhang et al.

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Short summary
Impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on deep convective clouds (DCCs) and precipitation are investigated using both the Morrison bulk and spectral-bin microphysics (SBM) schemes. With the SBM scheme, anthropogenic aerosols notably invigorate convective intensity and precipitation, making the simulated DCCs agreeing better with observations whereas such effect is absent with Morrison, mainly due to limitations of the saturation adjustment approach for droplet condensation and evaporation.
Impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on deep convective clouds (DCCs) and precipitation are...
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