Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-827
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-827
 
19 Jan 2023
19 Jan 2023
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Investigation of the summer 2018 European ozone air pollution episodes using novel satellite data and modelling

Richard J. Pope1,2, Brian J. Kerridge3,4, Martyn P. Chipperfield1,2, Richard Siddans3,4, Barry G. Latter3,4, Lucy J. Ventress3,4, Matilda A. Pimlott1, Wuhu Feng1,5, Edward Comyn-Platt6, Garry D. Hayman7, Stephen R. Arnold1, and Ailish M. Graham1 Richard J. Pope et al.
  • 1School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
  • 2National Centre for Earth Observation, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
  • 3Remote Sensing Group, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, United Kingdom
  • 4National Centre for Earth Observation, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, United Kingdom
  • 5National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
  • 6European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, UK
  • 7Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, United Kingdom

Abstract. In the summer of 2018, Europe experienced an intense heat wave which coincided with several persistent large-scale ozone (O3) pollution episodes. Novel satellite data of lower tropospheric column O3 from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp satellite showed substantial enhancements in 2018 relative to other years since 2012. Surface observations also showed ozone enhancements across large regions of continental Europe in summer 2018 compared to 2017. Enhancements to surface temperature and the O3 precursor gases carbon monoxide and methanol in 2018 were co-retrieved from MetOp observations by the same scheme. This analysis was supported by the TOMCAT chemistry transport model (CTM) to investigate processes driving the observed O3 enhancements. Through several targeted sensitivity experiments we show that meteorological processes, and emissions to a secondary order, were important for controlling the elevated O3 concentrations at the surface. However, mid-tropospheric (~500 hPa) O3 enhancements were dominated by meteorological processes. We find that contributions from stratospheric O3 intrusions ranged between 15–40 %. Analysis of back trajectories indicates that the import of O3-enriched air masses into Europe originated over the North Atlantic substantially increasing O3 in the 500 hPa layer during summer 2018.

Richard J. Pope et al.

Status: open (until 02 Mar 2023)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Richard J. Pope et al.

Richard J. Pope et al.

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Short summary
In the summer of 2018, Europe experienced several persistent large-scale ozone (O3) pollution episodes. Satellite tropospheric O3 and surface O3 data recorded substantial enhancements in 2018 relative to other years. Targeted model simulations showed that meteorological processes and emissions controlled the elevated surface O3, while mid-tropospheric O3 enhancements were dominated by stratospheric O3 intrusion and advection of North Atlantic O3-rich air masses into Europe.
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