Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-675
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-675
 
04 Oct 2022
04 Oct 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Aura/MLS observes, and SD-WACCM-X simulates the seasonality, quasi-biennial oscillation and El Nino Southern Oscillation of the migrating diurnal tide driving upper mesospheric CO primarily through vertical advection

Cornelius Csar Jude H. Salinas1,2, Dong L. Wu3, Jae N. Lee3,4, Loren C. Chang1,2, Liying Qian5, and Hanli Liu5 Cornelius Csar Jude H. Salinas et al.
  • 1Department of Space Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan City, 32001, Taiwan
  • 2Center for Astronautical Physics and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan City, 32001, Taiwan
  • 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, 20771, USA
  • 4Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland, 21201, USA
  • 5NCAR High Altitude Observatory, Boulder, Colorado, 80301, USA

Abstract. This work uses 17 years of upper mesospheric carbon monoxide (CO) and temperature observations by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on-board the Aura satellite to present and explain the seasonal and interannual variability of the migrating diurnal tide (DW1) component of upper mesospheric CO. This work then compares these observations to simulations by the Specified Dynamics – Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model with Ionosphere/Thermosphere eXtension (SD-WACCM-X). Results show that, for all seasons, MLS CO DW1 peaks above 85 km and has a latitude structure resembling the (1,1) mode in temperature. On the other hand, SD-WACCM-X DW1 also peaks above 85 km and has a latitude structure resembling the (1,1) mode but it simulates 2 local maximum of the (1,1) mode between 85 km and 92 km. Despite the differences in altitude structure, a tendency analysis and the adiabatic displacement method revealed that, on seasonal and interannual timescales, observed and modelled CO’s (1,1) component can be reproduced solely using vertical advection. It was also found that both observed and modelled CO’s (1,1) component contains interannual oscillations with periodicities close to that of the Quasi-biennial Oscillation and the El Nino Southern Oscillation. From these results, this work concludes that on seasonal and interannual timescales, the observed and modelled (1,1) mode affects the global structure of upper mesospheric CO primarily through vertical advection.

Cornelius Csar Jude H. Salinas et al.

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Cornelius Csar Jude H. Salinas et al.

Cornelius Csar Jude H. Salinas et al.

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Short summary
Upper mesospheric carbon monoxide (CO)’s photochemical lifetime is longer than dynamical timescales. This work uses satellite observations and model simulations to establish that the migrating diurnal tide and its seasonal and interannual variabilities drive CO primarily through vertical advection. Vertical advection is a transport process currently difficult to observe. This work further shows that we can use CO as a tracer for vertical advection across seasonal and interannual timescales.
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