Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-602
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-602
 
26 Aug 2022
26 Aug 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Composition and mixing state of Arctic aerosol and cloud residual particles from long-term single-particle observations at Zeppelin Observatory, Svalbard

Kouji Adachi1, Yutaka Tobo2,3, Makoto Koike4, Gabriel Freitas5, Paul Zieger5, and Radovan Krejci5 Kouji Adachi et al.
  • 1Department of Atmosphere, Ocean, and Earth System Modeling Research, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, 3050052, Japan
  • 2National Institute of Polar Research, Tachikawa, 1908518, Japan
  • 3Department of Polar Science, School of Multidisciplinary Sciences, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, SOKENDAI, Tachikawa, 1908518, Japan
  • 4Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 1130033, Japan
  • 5Department of Environmental Science & Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 10691, Sweden

Abstract. The Arctic region is sensitive to climate change and is warming faster than the global average. Aerosol particles change cloud properties by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles, thus influencing the Arctic climate system. Therefore, understanding the aerosol particle properties in the Arctic is needed to interpret and simulate their influences on climate. In this study, we collected ambient aerosol particles using whole-air and PM10 inlets and residual particles of cloud droplets and ice crystals from Arctic low-level clouds (typically, all-liquid or mixed-phase clouds) using a counterflow virtual impactor inlet at the Zeppelin Observatory near Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, within a time frame of 4 years. We measured the composition and mixing state of individual fine-mode particles using transmission electron microscopy. On the basis of their composition, the aerosol and cloud residual particles were classified into mineral dust, sea salt, K-bearing, sulfate, and carbonaceous particles. The number fraction of aerosol particles showed seasonal changes, with sulfate dominating in summer and sea salt increasing in winter. There was no measurable difference in the fractions between ambient aerosol and cloud residual particles collected at ambient temperatures above 0 °C. On the other hand, cloud residual samples collected at ambient temperatures below 0 °C had several times more sea salt and mineral dust particles and fewer sulfates than ambient aerosol samples, suggesting that sea spray and mineral dust particles may influence the formation of cloud particles in Arctic mixed-phase clouds. We also found that 43 % of mineral dust particles from cloud residual samples were mixed with sea salt, whereas only 18 % of mineral dust particles in ambient aerosol samples were mixed with sea salt. This study highlights the variety of aerosol compositions and mixing states that influence or are influenced by aerosol-cloud interactions in Arctic low-level clouds.

Kouji Adachi et al.

Status: open (until 07 Oct 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2022-602', Anonymous Referee #1, 08 Sep 2022 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2022-602', Anonymous Referee #2, 23 Sep 2022 reply

Kouji Adachi et al.

Kouji Adachi et al.

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Short summary
Ambient aerosol and cloud residual particles in the fine mode were collected at Zeppelin Observatory in Svalbard and were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy. Fractions of mineral dust and sea salt particles increased in cloud residual samples collected at ambient temperatures below 0°C. This study highlights the variety of aerosol and cloud residual particle compositions and mixing states that influence or are influenced by aerosol-cloud interactions in Arctic low-level clouds.
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